happiness

It’s Fascinating to Hear an American Accent (FGK-83)

I have no idea how this letter ended up in mom’s letter stash. I wonder if it was a pen pal of my aunt’s? I found it interesting to hear her perspective on King George dying. I was a bit surprised to see her questioning the American eating marmalade on toast. My limited knowledge about marmalade comes from Paddington Bear, and since he was from England I assumed that would be a thing there. And it’s good to know that no matter where the live, when parents plan a road trip it ends up being forced family fun time with bored to tears teens.

40 Alwoodley Lane

Alwoodley, Leeds, Yorks

England

10.3.52

Dear Sheila

Thanks a lot for your letter. I had a leaf floating in my teacup this morning and when I banged it between the backs of my hands it came unstuck first bang proving that I’d get a letter today (don’t think I’m mad but Nancy and I do this when we remember and it generally works).

We finished exams about three weeks ago. I did fairly well, I only failed History and that was on purpose as it was my ninth subject (we are only supposed to take 8 or less subjects in the General Cert. and these prelims were to decide which subjects to we take, so I decided for myself). As these exams were the first this school year and fairly important they’ve saved us the agony of reports till now. I opened mine the minute I got on the bus (strictly forbidden). It wasn’t too bad but to my utter disgust they called me Sara (Sara’s my proper name – I’m Sally-for-short).

It was dreadful when the King died. I think I shall always remember that day. There was the Entrance Exam for the 11 year olds on so there were just the 5th and 6th forms at school. We heard the rumour at break. After break it was French; the French mistress is a very religious Catholic and is very nice. When the news came through she had us all stand to say the Lord’s Prayer and everyone cried. The rest of the day was really miserable.

Our radio closed down that day apart from news bulletins. Until after the funeral we had just mournful music and improving talks. The very day after the funeral they returned to the usual light-hearted music – I thought it was pretty bad to have solemn music but that was for respect, but to just switch back straight afterwards was dreadful.

Wednesday

Sorry for dragging this letter out so.

It’s Pa’s so-called half day today so both parents have buzzed off to some symphony concert or other. They’ve been up to School this afternoon for an At Home 8th forum (sounds daft!). First they had a little talk about courses in the Sixth Form and careers. Then they had a cup of tea and a biscuit. After that enter all the mistresses to undergo severe interrogation. (Actually they said some quite nice things about me and not at all what I expected.) When they’d finished planning our lives they dispersed. Ma and Pa came home having learning all my guilty secrets but some hope someone had connived them their daughter was a credit to them so they were quite bucked.

The weekend before last we went down to Cromer in Norfolk. We intend (or rather Ma intends) to stay there for our summer holidays. We started off at the Saliuday at midday and arrived there at 8 o’clock (evening). After supper we went to bed. We got up at about 9 o’clock and had breakfast. There were several American soldiers there. It’s fascinating to hear an American accent. I suppose it’s as fascinating for you to hear an English accent but I can’t believe we have an accent. One of the soldiers was eating marmalade on toast with his bacon and eggs. Is this usual?

After breakfast Nance and I went onto the beach and then went to buy a paper. We left at about half-past-ten and took the coast road (along the shores of The Wash) back to King’s Lynn. We were looking for a suitable place for holidays. On the way we came through Sandringham – the big country estate where the king died. We didn’t have time to go to see the house or even go to Sandringham village. The road as it went through the estate was unfenced and on either side there was gorgeous woodland simply alive with pheasants and other game.

We got into Leeds at about a quarter to seven and after a bit of a mixup I met Meg and we went to hear Eileen Joyce at the Town hall. It was a marvellous concert but I got awfully stiff. Afterwards we managed to get her autograph. When we were walking down the Headrow to the Bus Station and awful little man tried to pick us up. It was rather pathetic but gosh we both got scared.

Sunday 16

Three weeks today I shall be starting out for Paris. I can hardly believe it. There’s a party of us going from school. Did I tell you about it? If everything turns out all right I shall be going to France again this year but then I shall stay near Lille.

This weekend is our weekend off again. Today we went up to Pateley Bridge. All we did when we got there was sit in the car and watch some stupid boys playing football or read. Then we had tea and came home. Really our trips are getting more and more pointless.

I haven’t been hunting for ages – or at least three weeks. The other two, on the spur of the moment, took a day off college last Tuesday and buzzed off to the meet at Almholem (where our precious Massarellas(?) have a couple of farms). They came back full of it. Apparently that was last meet as there’s been none activated since.

On Friday we went to see “Where No Vultures Fly”. It’s terribly good, have you seen it? It’s about a man who tries to set up a National Park in Africa. It’s filled in colour and there are lots of pictures of animals and things. Anthony Steel plays the part of the man, Bob Payton, and oh boy! Is he smashing!

Has Marshall got his skunk? I couldn’t see Ma letting us have a skunk around.

I’ve been looking for that Picture Post. We don’t get it at home, but they get it at school. Of course there’s not one December issue there. It’s funny to think you’ve seen Elizabeth and Philip once and you live in Canada and I who live in England have only seen them once too I can’t remember her much except that she’s small and has a lovely complexion. I can’t imagine Margaret being only about five-feet.

Well I must close. Write soon

Love Sally

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