happiness

A History in Photos 13 (FGK 170)

Sheila’s Birthday Party. Left to Right: Back row: Marshall Copithorne, Harvey Buckley, Bob Robinson, Clarence Buckley. Front Row: Kenny Copithorne, Richard Copithorne, Sheila Copithorne (without her two front teeth), Anne Copithorne, and Sue Robinson
Remember how Grandma loved wild roses?
Lynn Burger, Jinny Walker, and Cherie Copithorne, shelling peas for Grandma Copithorne. 1979 (along with Penny our dog)
Sheila, Marshall, and Margie
This is Edna and husband, Sheila and Marshall. How small Sheila is in this snap. This was taken outside of sun porch at their home. Note they are sitting in a bunch of flowers. Edna is great on having plenty of flowers of every kind. Edna has a big smile on this snap but she is always smiling. I believe when she is mad she is smiling. The snap I sent you before was Marshall he has grown since this was taken.
Percy and Edna Copithorne with cousin May’s baby. (May was also mentioned in photos from a couple of days ago. I have this vague memory of visiting someone named May and her husband on Vancouver Island. I remember them because he had set up a conveyor belt of sorts to bring driftwood up from the beach so they could burn it as firewood and they had grafted several trees to produce different kinds of apples etc. Can anyone verify this? As a child they seemed like the kind of couple that would be written about in some really good old book and I always kind of wanted to turn out like that.)
I love seeing photos of the place before the highway.
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happiness

A History in Photos 12 (FGK 169)

Today marks 4 years since mom passed. I started sharing these stories last year in the hopes that I would get to understand her better, to know who she really was. I’m not sure I found what I was originally looking for, but this process has helped me in ways I never could have imagined. I was still feeling pretty broken in my own life from the challenges of recent years and I was seeking guidance and support, although I didn’t know that at the time. I think I have a better understanding of the strength and courage the entire family had to get through what they were faced with . Polio didn’t just impact mom, but her entire family. And the faith Grandma carried, the grace and humility she showed in her letters and memories have left me with gratitude for the incredibly strong line of women that I come from. The letters helped me see how Grandma was held steady by her faith in God during what must have been an unbelievably challenging time. It’s one thing reading the letters on this side of history – knowing that mom survived and knowing how things turned out. But at the time…. There would have been no way to know, no guarantees, and everything was just blind faith. As someone who really struggles with trusting that God has my back even when I can’t see it – this has been very comforting.

Look at how dressed up Grandma and Grandpa got to go visit mom at the hospital! And the garden in the background!! I remember as a kid playing with the snapdragons in this flower garden. It’s gone now, and there’s a deck near here – but I really miss the flowers growing along the side of the house. Grandma really had a green thumb.

Percy and Edna going to visit Margie who was in hospital
Margie and Len Carrol on the horse (I think this is “Slim”??)
Sheila, Margi, and Mother (Grandma/Edna)
Aileen, Sheila, Margie 1949
Sheila and Mother (Edna Copithorne)
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A History in Photos 11 (FGK 168)

I loved it when the house looked like this.
Sheila and Margie copithorne and old Buck
Sheila with Smokey the cat in the can
Percy and Edna Copithorne at May _____ home after catching a salmon off Victoria
Left to right: David Copithorne, Lawrence Copithorne, Clarence Buckley, Sheila Copithorne, baby??, Harvey Buckley, Marshall Copithorne, Margie Copithorne, Gordon Davies.
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A History in Photos 9 (FGK 166)

Some of the most important members of the family – the pets of days gone by

Old Buster our first dog and we called him Buster
Buster at Copithorne’s May 1964 (this must be at least Buster II – and they had a Buster when I was a child who must have been at least Buster III who was one of the best dogs)
Hatching turkey eggs (ok these aren’t pets but they’re here for lack of a better spot)
Rex and Leader September 1952
What a cutie!!
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A History in Photos 8 (FGK 165)

Grandpa riding in the Stampede Parade. I believe he’s riding Toots who absolutely terrified me as a child. Not only was she gigantic but she was fiercely protective of my horse and one time charged me and chased me away while I was out alone in the field catching my horse – I would have been maybe 6 or so. I just remember flaring nostrils and legs coming at me, and then she stopped inches away from me, put her head to my face and snorted loudly. I booked it back home crying. Got very little sympathy too haha
Phyllis Strutt 1942. She is a relative of Grandmas on the Brown side I believe
Percy and Edna Copithorne home and pets. On the left you can see the lean to kitchen grandma described in her memories.
Think of the quality of cameras back in the day and then consider how close the photographer must have been to these bears.
We are about to discover the answer to the age old question “does a bear poop in the woods?”
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happiness

A History in Photos 7 (FGK 164)

Only two photos today but they’re a couple of my favorites and copies hang in our hallway. The first one is my grandpa with my great aunt (his sister) coming back from a successful fishing trip at the creek below the house. The second one is my uncle and my mom doing the exact same thing about 40 years later. For some reason we didn’t do a similar photo for the next two generations.

Percy and his sister Marjorie near the Jumping Pound Creek 1904 or 1905
Marshall and sister Margie near the Jumping Pound Creek about 1945

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A History in Photos 6 (FGK 163)

The oil well going up behind the barn – 1952.
Spring calving 1955. Herefords.
Jean McKenzie-Grieves and son in the summer of 1945. She was grandma’s best friend from Cochrane who moved to Innisfail. And it was just while going through these photos at my uncle and aunt’s place that I realized that since mom’s middle name was Jean that she was named after grandma’s best friend.
Jumping Pound riders on cattle round up.
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A History in Photos 5 (FGK 162)

There is a real mixture of photos today: cows, ancestors, horses, home, and mom during the hospital years when she was so sick from polio.

Marshall Copithorne’s Feedlot
Sam Copithorne and Jack Copithorne. Photo copyright H. Pollard Photography, Calgary. If this was a more modern photo that would be a phone in his hand haha.
At the far calf: Albert and possibly Ferad. Branding: Marshall Copithorne. At head of close calf: Jack Buckley. At hind legs: Clarence Buckley. Photo copyright H. Pollard, Calgary.
Left to Right: Len Kumlin, Clarence Copithorne, Billy Nash, Joe Chee, Percy Copithorne, ? Kumlin/Lazy J employee, Marshall Copithorne, Jim Copithorne. Photo copyright H. Pollard, Calgary
Mom enjoying some outside time in a hospital bed (presumably on a stay at home from the hospital after polio) outside of Grandma’s house. This photo is pretty powerful for me. There aren’t many photos of mom during this time, this may be the only one I’ve ever seen of her.
Unknown woman and baby
Home sweet home
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A History in Photos 4 (FGK 161

Ethel Nicoll and Edna Brown in front of Jumping Pond School (not Jumping Pound School, spelling was different for the school).
Grandpa with his first moose either 1920 or 1924. (Note on the back of the photo grandma writes 1920, the paper attached to it says 1924 – not sure which is correct)
Percy Copithorne after a successful days hunt with Frank Sibbald and Jack Copithorne circa 1924
Frank Copithorne breaking horses. He did this every June.
Marshall Copithorne 1964 (different chair but I’m sitting in the same spot now as I’m writing this)
Anyone who has been to the Hall knows this photo. Jumping Pound Orchestra. Len Kumlin on horn, Percy Copithorne violin, Carmen Barkley-Cook accordion, Margy Copithorne-Buckley piano.
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A History in Photos 3 (FGK 160)

Last night I received a wonderful gift, and my uncle spent hours (literally hours – I think over 3) going through my photos with me and a couple of cousins, and writing down who was in every one of them. Not only did he remember an incredible number of people, but he was able to name many of the animals in the photos as well. I am grateful and it will certainly make sharing these memories more accurate. Again though, if anyone is able to recognize anyone who is unnamed please pass that information on to me (or any good stories associated with the photos).

Additionally, I am looking for a local (Calgary area) recommendation for someone who does high quality scanning of old photos. I want to publish these in a book for the family to share and enjoy and my scanner is not of a good enough quality. Thank you in advance for anyone who has any suggestions.

Uncle Marshall down the hill at what is now Kumlins (Jack Copithorne’s)
Uncle Marshall said “if anyone tries to tell you I don’t know about turkeys, here’s proof that I know what I’m talking about”
Left to Right: Sheila Copithorne, (Back) Clarence Buckley, Anne Copithorne, Marshall Copithorne, Harvey Buckley, Kenny Copithorne, Richard Copithorne.
Grandma and Grandpa in front of the barn
Grandpa (Percy Copithorne)
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