happiness

A History in Photos 13 (FGK 170)

Sheila’s Birthday Party. Left to Right: Back row: Marshall Copithorne, Harvey Buckley, Bob Robinson, Clarence Buckley. Front Row: Kenny Copithorne, Richard Copithorne, Sheila Copithorne (without her two front teeth), Anne Copithorne, and Sue Robinson
Remember how Grandma loved wild roses?
Lynn Burger, Jinny Walker, and Cherie Copithorne, shelling peas for Grandma Copithorne. 1979 (along with Penny our dog)
Sheila, Marshall, and Margie
This is Edna and husband, Sheila and Marshall. How small Sheila is in this snap. This was taken outside of sun porch at their home. Note they are sitting in a bunch of flowers. Edna is great on having plenty of flowers of every kind. Edna has a big smile on this snap but she is always smiling. I believe when she is mad she is smiling. The snap I sent you before was Marshall he has grown since this was taken.
Percy and Edna Copithorne with cousin May’s baby. (May was also mentioned in photos from a couple of days ago. I have this vague memory of visiting someone named May and her husband on Vancouver Island. I remember them because he had set up a conveyor belt of sorts to bring driftwood up from the beach so they could burn it as firewood and they had grafted several trees to produce different kinds of apples etc. Can anyone verify this? As a child they seemed like the kind of couple that would be written about in some really good old book and I always kind of wanted to turn out like that.)
I love seeing photos of the place before the highway.
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A History in Photos 8 (FGK 165)

Grandpa riding in the Stampede Parade. I believe he’s riding Toots who absolutely terrified me as a child. Not only was she gigantic but she was fiercely protective of my horse and one time charged me and chased me away while I was out alone in the field catching my horse – I would have been maybe 6 or so. I just remember flaring nostrils and legs coming at me, and then she stopped inches away from me, put her head to my face and snorted loudly. I booked it back home crying. Got very little sympathy too haha
Phyllis Strutt 1942. She is a relative of Grandmas on the Brown side I believe
Percy and Edna Copithorne home and pets. On the left you can see the lean to kitchen grandma described in her memories.
Think of the quality of cameras back in the day and then consider how close the photographer must have been to these bears.
We are about to discover the answer to the age old question “does a bear poop in the woods?”
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happiness

A History in Photos 7 (FGK 164)

Only two photos today but they’re a couple of my favorites and copies hang in our hallway. The first one is my grandpa with my great aunt (his sister) coming back from a successful fishing trip at the creek below the house. The second one is my uncle and my mom doing the exact same thing about 40 years later. For some reason we didn’t do a similar photo for the next two generations.

Percy and his sister Marjorie near the Jumping Pound Creek 1904 or 1905
Marshall and sister Margie near the Jumping Pound Creek about 1945

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A History in Photos 6 (FGK 163)

The oil well going up behind the barn – 1952.
Spring calving 1955. Herefords.
Jean McKenzie-Grieves and son in the summer of 1945. She was grandma’s best friend from Cochrane who moved to Innisfail. And it was just while going through these photos at my uncle and aunt’s place that I realized that since mom’s middle name was Jean that she was named after grandma’s best friend.
Jumping Pound riders on cattle round up.
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A History in Photos 4 (FGK 161

Ethel Nicoll and Edna Brown in front of Jumping Pond School (not Jumping Pound School, spelling was different for the school).
Grandpa with his first moose either 1920 or 1924. (Note on the back of the photo grandma writes 1920, the paper attached to it says 1924 – not sure which is correct)
Percy Copithorne after a successful days hunt with Frank Sibbald and Jack Copithorne circa 1924
Frank Copithorne breaking horses. He did this every June.
Marshall Copithorne 1964 (different chair but I’m sitting in the same spot now as I’m writing this)
Anyone who has been to the Hall knows this photo. Jumping Pound Orchestra. Len Kumlin on horn, Percy Copithorne violin, Carmen Barkley-Cook accordion, Margy Copithorne-Buckley piano.
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A History in Photos 2 (FGK 159)

Fortunately Grandma wrote on the back of most of today’s photos – except this top one which I absolutely love and the one with the group of people. Enjoy!!

I would never have guessed this was Grandma – but I love it!!! I’m also guessing this is what we called “Grandma’s secret gate” when we were kids as it was hidden in the hedge of trees that were planted to block out the highway noise.
Jumping Pound Stampede 1923. Clem Gardner pick-up man
Percy Copithorne riding the ram with his mother and Aunt Ada Wills and brother George in the background. Note there were no treated fence posts of baled hay. Circa 1905. Photo taken by Sam Copithorne.
It’s weird to me that they scribbled out all the actual information about the photo and titled it “ride ‘em cowboy” but fortunately Grandma had written the information on the back as well including who took the photo.
Uncle Marshall
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happiness

A History In Photos 1 (FGK 158)

I am starting a series called “A History in Photos”. I found this box of old photos of Grandma’s in my closet a couple of years ago. Some of them are labeled and some are not, so some days we will get to play “who are these people?” And hopefully y’all can help me out. I will experiment with some better lighting- the photos are in better shape than the scanning shows. Anyway, here we go!!

Edited to add: it seems taking a photo works better than scanning the photos so I’ve included those. And I’ve had some help from a cousin deciphering grandma’s handwriting which is greatly appreciated!!

CPR Station about 1913. Left to right: Mr Alex McEwen, other man is Charlie McGill (I think). Written on the side: you are welcome to use this picture if you wish.
Ladies Group 1909-10. Left to right Front row: Mrs Alec(?) Mortimer, Mrs McBain, Mrs Peyto, Mrs M McNamee Back row: Mrs McEwen, Mrs Grummit(?), Mrs Foster, Mrs Christanson, unknown, Mrs White (later became Mrs Chas Grayson) Mrs Campbell. Front row: baby Earl Mortimer, girl is Cathie McNamee, boy is Kenneth Campbell
I can’t make this out well enough – if anyone else can I appreciate that!! *Edit: Reme and Mrs Claston, Ruth Claston, Mrs Marion McEwen-Barkley, Marg (Mary?) McBain, Mr Laird (teachers)
Harvest Festival, St. Andrews Presbyterian church Cochrane 1911
Sorry uncle Gord
Louise Copithorne (Mrs Chas Copithorne) I didn’t know her but I think she’s absolutely stunning. I found her grave online: Louise Caroling TempanyCopithorne
BIRTH
1909
DEATH
1979 (aged 69–70)
Sorry again uncle Gord
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The Opening of the Jumping Pound Hall (FGK 157)

These notes were attached to the end of my “Grandma Remembers” booklet. Dad must have typed these out, and I assume the comments are his. Kind of cool to get some bonus history on the Hall, I love that old building and am currently a board member.

The Opening of the Jumping Pound Hall

Notes by Edna Copithorne

House parties started Hall.

Built in stages – didn’t have enough money to line it so collected $50.00 from near neighbours. Hauled lumber over the rough road from Cochrane. Mrs. Harris was stranded on Cochrane Hill with a broken wheel on her democrat so rode home on the lumber wagon with the boys.

Charlie Cook said “Pesky Hall. I’ll fix it when the grown was frozen” – he used dynamite.

Galley <I cannot read her writing> and Bar played for local dances even in the homes before the hall was built.

The opening of the Hall was a big deal – stuffed animal heads all around the walls and bear skins, buffalo skins, etc. It was lit by Coleman lamps and decorated with beautiful Chinese lanterns. What orchestra was it for the opening dance?

The lunch was a drawing card- ham sandwiches, 12 or 14 loaves and salmon. Then the local ladies out-did each other making cakes.

One masquerade ended up in a free for all. All the men ended up out in the yard fighting each other. There was bits of costumes all over the country for the rest of the winter.

The floor managers were Dave Lawson, Frank Sibbald, and Cy Hopkin used to bring his won (?). Lennie Blow ran a taxi from the dam to the dances.

The pot-bellied stove was popular on winter nights. Clyde Lynn supplied this stove and the cook stove came from <no name inserted, just a blank>.

Right from the start Archie McClean <that’s the way she spelled it> was the cook in the kitchen and was famous for his good coffee made in those old copper boilers.

Clover leaf big white cups and saucers. Big old fashioned granite coffee pots.

(The land was donated by John Copithorne for the Hall)

Archie always wore a chef’s cap and a big white apron and wouldn’t let anyone in the kitchen. Paid Archie $5.00 a night for cleaning the hall etc.

Bill Lee wired the hall for electricity.

March 12th 1828 – $199.00 taken in. Price of piano, chairs, card tables $654.75 – total cost to build was $2612.00. Bullas orchestra was first to play – CFCN

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Grandma Remembers (FGK 156)

I found this shoved in a bookcase in Dad’s office, aka my bedroom, aka Grandma’s bedroom. I have no recollection of having given her this book – I was 13 at the time – but I’m so glad I did. I’ve always been interested in our history, probably the reason why I have this ever so useful history degree. Anyway, this is kind of interesting and I had no idea, besides being from Ontario, of any of this history.

I figure Dad must have put this all together but I’m not sure when. It certainly wasn’t 1984 because he was clearly on the internet, but it also wasn’t 2014 because he used MapQuest (although my parents loved MapQuest). Either way, I’m glad he did it. It looks like he’s put together some of her relatives. I really knew nothing about Grandma’s lineage, so it is really cool for me to read a bit about about where she came from.

Grandma Remembers

September 27th, 1984

Melissa gave Grandma a “Grandma Remembers” book for her 76th birthday and Grandma wrote in response:

September 27th 1984

Thank you Melissa Ramsay for this thoughtful and flattering book for my birthday. For me, the title should be “Grandma Forgets”. Is it because I’m now 76 years old? I don’t think so. I’ve always been mentally lazy – a dreamer. I will do my best to fill it with facts.

My parents were both the youngest in their family and each family had nine children,. My mother lost her mother when she was two years old and was raised by her maiden aunt, Miss Betsy Thompson, and her bachelor brother Uncle William Thompson who lived with their widowed mother on a farm out at Westmeath near Pembroke Ontario. My mother had very fond memories of her grandmother being very loving and kind to her and her little brother Thomas who also lived there.

Her grandmother was a pioneer and lived there when the Indians were still unfriendly. Her grandmother was very popular for her skills in setting broken arms or legs and helping sick people. Her grandfather helped the Rideau Canal in “Ottawa” when it was still called “Bytown.”

Aunt Betsy used to tel her she could remember when they would put a few sacks of wheat in canoes and take it down to the Ottawa River to mill to grind it into flour. Aunt Betsy remembered as a small child being terrified of the forest fires when they would go to the river for safety sake.

My Great Aunt Betsy was a popular member of the Ladies Aid in the local church. I remember seeing a very beautiful hanging lamp above her organ which the church group had given her; it had a beautiful flowered globe with prisms hanging around it and a coal lamp under it. The organ was very beautiful too and she left it to me when she died. It is now in the Pembroke museum. Uncle William Thompson gave my mother a beautiful piano when she got married and your aunt Sheila Burger has it now Melissa.

My Mother’s father went to New Westminster British Columbia when it was called Port Moody. He went there int eh 1870s thinking it would be the terminal for the CP Railway and would become a big sea-port city, but Vancouver became that. He bought many lots in Port Moody and was preparing to reunite his family there in a home he built but he got sick and died there. I have a letter which he wrote to Great Aunt Betsy saying he bought a piano for Mattie (my mother) and there was a piano teacher there to continue her lessons but of course that never came about. You could perhaps someday try and find his grave in the oldest graveyard in New Westminster, BC.

My mother’s mother “Margaret Ruth Sullivan” was also from near Pembroke and her relatives ware still living there. There is a placebo n the Ottawa River called “Sullivan’s Point”, named after her people. My spelling is terrible Melissa, check it and correct it.

My mother’s youngest brother was a reporter on the first steamship to sail Lake Superior and it was caught in a bad storm and all aboard were lost. Another of there brothers was drowned when the ship he was on went down coming from the gold mines in Alaska in the early days.

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